2
Mar

Gluten-free diet and lots of lows

A couple of weeks ago I had an appointment with Patricia, the dietician in my endo's office. The GI Dr recommended that I meet with the Rd to get strategies for converting to a gluten-free diet. He asked if I would be willing to meet with either the dietician in his office or the one in my endo's office. Sure? Why not. I called that day to book an appointment with Patricia, and later that month we sat down together to talk about my celiac diagnosis, what I'm eating, how the new diet is affecting BGs, etc.

I started the conversation by pointing out that since the celiac dx, my consumption of wine and cider has pretty much skyrocketed, while preparation of healthy home-cooked meals has dropped to an all-time low. She gave me some strategies for making small changes towards a better/more balanced gluten-free diet, then asked if she could download my pump to review my data while I was in the clinic.

Sure? Why not.

I hand over my pump. She links it up to her Carelink Pro, generates a few reports, and leaves briefly to pick them up from the printer. When she returns, she sits at her desk with a highlighter and attacks the reports in front of her. A few moments later she pushes a paper showing sensor data towards me.

"Do you see what I've highlighted here?"

"I --"  .....  "Lows."

"These are severe lows. 1's and 2's. This is a week's worth of data."

I review the paper again. It is speckled with yellow dots. A LOT of yellow dots.

Waking up in the morning? Yellow dot. Breakfast - spike city. Post breakfast? Yellow dot. Lunch time? Moderate hill. Post-lunch? Yellow dot. Pre-dinner? Yellow dot. Post-dinner? Spike, plateau, moderate descent. Bedtime? BG within range.

Overnight? Yellow Dot City.

Patricia looks at me with kindness in her eyes and says she would like to call Brenda, my RN, in to help troubleshoot some of these stubborn lows. I shrug. Why not?

Enter Brenda. Brenda reviews Yellow Dot City. Brenda does not look happy about Yellow Dot City.

Brenda shuffles through the papers to find the one that lists my pump settings. She turns to me and her gaze sort of softens. She tells me that we need to do something about these lows. She explains that if I'm comfortable with her approach, she wants to slash my basal rates quite significantly. She suggests modifying one of my meal carb ratios as well, explaining that these things should leave me a little bit higher than I usually aim to be. She backs this up by showing me studies and research documenting how above-average-glucose levels over time can help to restore low glucose sensitivity. I take her word for it -- usually I'm interested in things like this, but I just can't bring myself to want to read the paper this time.

Brenda tells me it looks like I'm burnt out. She says she knows that I know that something isn't working, but analyzing the data in order to fix it is a daunting task, and she says she understands that I'm not feeling up to it.

She asks me to download my data in a few weeks and provide that to her. She's not asking me to do anything differently - not wanting extra monitoring or checking BGs. She wants me to carry on as usual, but with higher BGs. Her goal is to have me running between 8 and 10 for a few weeks, which will hopefully bring back some of my low glucose symptoms and allow me to feel lows coming on.

She doesn't ask me to do anything new. Nothing extra. Just a one-off data download in a few weeks so she can review the progress.

I know I'm lucky to see my doctor in a clinic where my team (RN, RD, MD) can call on one another to support my care -- but never have I been more appreciative of having a team who recognizes what I'm capable of and works with me to try to fix things.

Back to Top