4
Nov

13? Balderdash, says I!

Welcome, ladies and gents. It is November 4th, meaning that we are 4 day in to Diabetes Month.
For today, I would like to give you a glimpse into the frustration that comes along with this big ball of autoimmune-related shit called Diabetes.
Ketones start spilling out into urine at a BG of 13 mmol/L. This is a well-documented fact, check the American Diabetes Association or similar sites to confirm. 
So why, then, does a BG like this:

CGM reading of 12.8

CGM this morning


Confirmed via fingerstick:

BG meter value of 12.3

BG via meter


Produce ketones that look like THIS:?!

Ketone stick measuring high ketones

PURPLE ketone stick


Please excuse me, I'll be spending the rest of the day suppressing the urge to scream while mindlessly beating my head against a wall out of frustration.

1
Nov

‚ÄčRemembering the good to distract from the mildly inconvenient

I had an endo appointment 2 weeks ago. For the most part it went swimmingly.
It started with a resident bringing me into the room and incredulously gawking at the pump clipped to my hip. "Whoa! You wear a pager?? Don't see too many of those these days!"
I groaned inwardly, figuring this guy must be new and assuming that this would be a long appointment. I gently(ish) asked if he had spent much time on rotation at the Endocrine and Diabetes Clinic, and he said no, today was his first day.

That explained a lot.

I think I taught him quite a few things. I showed him my "pager" and described how this was an insulin pump: look, here's the reservoir filled with insulin, the tubing, the infusion set. I showed him my cgm, and told him cgms last longer than infusion sets, at 6-7 days instead of 2-4. I mentioned that there are a few different pump companies and at least two CGM companies in Canada, so the reports and data would look different from other devices. He was speechless when I brought out the printed Carelink reports that my doctor likes to see (Logbook, Sensor daily overlay, and Device Settings).

To kill time, since I knew I wasn't going to be able to get any helpful medical advice from this doctor who, though he meant well, was nowhere near trained enough to answer the questions I have regarding my care, I showed him my toe. This is the toe that was brutally introduced to a very heavy suitcase on the last day of my honeymoon, which caused bruising and swelling, eventually leaving me with half a toenail. Gross.

The slightly inept doctor assured me that it looked good, and all there was to do was to wait for the nail to grow back. I had assumed as much, but it was still good to hear.
When my Endo arrived, she was positively beaming. She told the new guy that he was about to get some serious training, courtesy of a "model" patient.

Yes, she actually used those words.

I know that NOT bringing Carelink printouts doesn't mean I am any less invested in my care. I know that failing to check my BG 4-10 times per day does not mean that a patient is any less worried about the eventual onset of complications. I know all of this. That said, I was pretty frigging ecstatic to be recognized for the work that I do prior to each most appointment(s).

We discussed most of the usual stuff: changed some basal rates, changed overnight insulin sensitivity, reviewed some blood test results. I found out that my a1c is at the most ass-kickingest that it has ever been, so I was pretty happy with this appointment overall.
We also talked about Eventual Family Planning. Husband and I aren't ready for that just yet, but my Endo took me through what I need to know when we do get to that point. It was then that I received a recommendation to see an ophthalmologist to have my eyes fully checked out prior to trying for a baby.
I see an optometrist every year, usually without much excitement. My eyes have stayed the same for about a decade, and although every appointment comes with the concern that This Will Be the Appointment Where I Get Terrible News Regarding My Vision, it hasn't happened yet. I've never before been referred to an ophthalmologis though.
Cut to today. I call the hospital where I see my Endo, and ask to be transferred to the Eye clinic. I ask about scheduling an appointment.
"No, you need a referral for that."
*sigh*. Ok.
Email my Endo's assistant requesting a referral. Email bounces back; assistant no longer works for the hospital.
Call hospital general line. Ask who the new assistant for my Endo is.
"We don't have an assistant or Program Administrator on file for that doctor."
*sigh*. Ok.
Call back, punch in the extension for my Endo's office. It is 11:20. "The phone lines are now closed. Calls to the Endocrine and diabetes Centre are answered between the hours of 8:30am to 11:30am and 1:30pm to 4:15pm, Monday to Thursday."

I give up, for today. I'm still at work, currently seething at the perceived injustice of having to wait two hours to make a phone call that I sort of think I shouldn't have to make to begin with, as a referral could have been provided at my appointment 2 weeks ago.

Still, I am humbled by the fact that I get to be upset about an inability to speak with my doctor, because I actually have a doctor.
Also slightly frustrated in admitting that the only person this hissy fit is harming is myself. Frustrated to admit that regardless of any delays, I still need to make this phone call (to get an email address, to email a request, to get a referral, to make another phone call to schedule an appointment).
It will get done. It has to, so it will. I'm allowed to be a little grumpy though.
So. Remembering the good hospital stuff (like how well that appointment went) to distract from the inconvenient stuff (aka the need to jump through hoops in order to get another appointment). Grrr.

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