30
Mar

Check it out

THIS makes me feel like I need to work harder. 

OHTAC emailed me last year about how they would be reviewing CGM as part of  potentially fundable  cost of t1d. I requested that  they reevaluate their decision to deny coverage based on existing studies,  and was told it would be reviewed this year. 

I think I am getting quiet and complacent. I have cgm funding through work, so I have not been advocating as loudly for those who don't.  This has to change. 

http://www.hqontario.ca/Evidence-to-Improve-Care/Health-Technology-Assessment/Reviews-And-Recommendations/Continuous-Glucose-Monitoring-for-Patients-With-Diabetes

https://some-diabetic.tumblr.com/post/158987681521/diabeticink-26250-out-of-pocket-for-3-more

31
Jan

I did this to myself

I know I have no right to complain.
My site was on day 4, and as an upper-butt-cheek-infusion-set, it has seen quite a bit of wear over the last 4 days.

My 6-day-lifespan sensor was restarted and was on day 8.
I postponed changing my site and sensor last night. "It's wasteful to change a site when I still have a half-day of insulin left."   "The infusion set doesn't even hurt that much. I'll just sleep on my other side again tonight."     "That sensor worked so well for its first round! It will be fine for a few more days."
The lies we tell ourselves to justify not having to change a site. Not having to feel that jab, twice, as two devices are inserted for 3- and 6- day spans (or 5 and 10, if you tend to stretch out your supplies like I do). All of this led to me sitting at work this morning with a splitting headache and a thirst like you wouldn't believe (I'm at almost 2L of water so far. Been at work for just over 2 hours). Cal reminder alarm prompted me to check my BG and to be quite honest, I probably wouldn't have bothered if not for that alarm. My cgm had me at 8.4 and dropping, so I wasn't worried.
Still, though. I should calibrate.

Fingerstick, 18.6 (335 mg/dL).
Well, then.
Working on a set change with this kind of headache is challenging. I rip open an alcohol swab, then stop. Squint. Rub my aching temples. What was I doing? Oh, right. Syringe, wipe top of insulin bottle. Use now-disconnected pump to calculate the correction dose. Deliver correction.
Another alcohol swab. What was this one for? Wipe top of insulin bottle, feeling vaguely like I've already done this. Think back, pushing through the throbbing haze of red that clouds my head and makes coherent thought a distant memory. Aha! Yes, I did do this.
Do it again. Change infusion set. Charge transmitter. Replace sensor. Look at the mess of medical waste and wonder why I didn't do this yesterday.

Looks like I have some tidying to do...

14
Jan

Openaps progress, January 2017

I've got the pi recognizing my pump. I can send commands from the pi to the pump. Working on reports (I think) to summarize data now.
I'm also learning that there is an entire community of openaps folks online who provide tons of help, suggestions, & encouragement. Exciting stuff!!

16
Oct

Fun math problem!

It's 2am. You have had 6 drinks over the past 6 hours. 

You have had a 70% temp basal set for the past 3 hours. It is scheduled to continue for 8 more hours.

Your current BG is 10.0. 

Your cgm says 9.6 with a straight-ish line, so it's not too far off. 


You have 0.3 units of active insulin on board. Your pump recommends an additional 0.9 units to treat the high bg.
You are a 40 minute drive away from the people who know how to help if things go south. The alcohol makes you much more sensitive to insulin than you usually are.

If you wake up with a BG above 12, your hangover will be magnified and you likely won't be able to make the drive home tomorrow.  If you go below 5, your cgm will wake up half the cabin.
What do you do?

4
Oct

Smiles for a Tuesday morning

This definitely perked me up this morning: 

*sighs contentedly*

28
Sep

Mildly interesting news

& I promise that a fair bit of thought went into this post name. I can't call it a big change. I tried to be excited, I really did, but a vague possibility of a new device that will be available in my region in an unspecified* number of years** is not really something that makes me feel particularly optimistic.
Still, it's a new development, and I do believe that any move towards a true artificial pancreas is a good thing -- even if it's likely to be a little while before it makes it to Canada.

So here, behold. Medtronic's latest and greatest: the 670g.

*The lovely Medtronic Canada staffer who took my call this afternoon assured me that across the corporation, staff have no knowledge of anything involving Canadian device approval. She clarified that it is not a case of them being prevented from discussing yet-to-be-approved devices; rather, Medtronic has said zilch about the 67og's availability in other countries.
**Just a guess. "Years" is hopefully a bit of a stretch. I imagine its probably going to be 1-2 years, especially since they're not even going to ship in the US until spring of 2017.

4
Aug

Pre-wedding update!

Omg omg omg

I am 39 hours away from being married.
I have not been wearing a sensor. Keep meaning to start a new one. I should do that tonight, probably.
I've been checking less with no sensor. Maybe 2-3 times per day. No bad lows, though? & no highs that I've noticed. Doesn't mean they haven't happened though. 
It's almost time. I will start a new sensor, so that it has time to wet properly before the wedding begins. Just once I finish this book?

6
Feb

Ooh, new colours!

Yesterday's bleedy  sensor has turned a lovely shade of purple. Grrr.

image

4
Feb

New sensor

Owww!

Experiencing quite a bit of arm bleeding tonight.

*sigh*.

10
Sep

Ben says WAKE UP (or, Blood Sugar Dog to the rescue)

Pump says low.

Melody says shhhh pump, I  sleep.

Boyfriend is not home.

Pooch says NO HUMAN WAKE UP YOU ARE BEEPING WAKE UP EMERGENCY OMG OMG OMG.

image

Low alert

Thx pooch.

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