25
Aug

Rafting and pump supplies

I went whitewater rafting this weekend.  I spoke to my d-team in advance so I could have a solid plan for switching to injections for a day, since my last pump vacation was a bit of a disaster. This time around wasn't perfect,  but it was pretty damn good!

I disconnected from my pump and left it in a cooler in the car (along with my transmitter) after giving a bolus for half of my morning basal insulin.  We decided  to go with half because
     a) rafting is a ton of exercise (possible lows),
     b) I would be in the sun all day (again,  another trigger for lows), and
     c) On my last "pump vacation, " I went super low for a loooong time (so my full dose of basal insulin would probably cause -- you guessed it -- lows!)

I went low somewhere during the safety training. 2 bottles of juice and a banana for me, & then we were off to the boats! The rafting team had my emergency bag in their dry bag; Boyfriend and another close friend both had glucose gel packs in the pockets of their shorts, and I felt as prepared for the day as I could possibly be.

By lunch I was 15.7. Hardly surprising,  since I gobbled down around 90g of carbs to treat the low before we left... At lunch I added together the insulin I'd need for the correction,  the meal bolus, and the "missed basal" bolus, then gave 2/3 of the whole thing, and by the time we finished for the day I was back at 5.6. I think I'd call this a successful(ish) pump-free day. I've obviously got a bit of work to do to fix what happened in the morning, but I stayed safe all day and ended up with a good #, so I'm happy with it!

Of course,  whitewater rafting beat the crap out of both my sensor and infusion set site. The infusion set (big bloody mess) still worked but was extremely sore afterwards,  so it has been changed to a new location. The sensor was also pretty badly squished and abused throughout the day (and gave me a sensor error when I first reconnected it) but seems to be working fairly well again. The excess tape that I had to use to hold it down is making the whole thing feel like a big sticky glob of constantly damp and itchy grossn.ess on my side, but at least it's only 36 hours until I'm due for a new sensor.

22
Jul

CGM Start

CGM start day was... interesting. I got up early to do a set change before breakfast, and since it was an important day, naturally my pump kept giving me "NO DELIVERY" alarms. Every time. I don't know what caused it, but something about the set was blocking the tubing. Infusion sets are expensive, so I really wanted to try to make this one work. I tried reattaching the plunger to the reservoir and manually pushing insulin through the set -- no luck there. I swapped out the new reservoir for the old one, as it still had a few units in it -- & this time, manually pushing insulin through the set worked. I reattach the new reservoir, prime the tubing, and this time it all works just fine.

But wait! It gets better!

I got to the hospital and met with my nurse, the Medtronic nurse, and John (someone else who sees the same endo as I do), and we sat down in a conference room to start the training. My nurse showed us, using a "training" sensor and a pillow shaped like an abdomen, how to do the full sensor start.

We got the chance to use our own "training" sensors to do a practice run first, and I'm glad we did. My sensor jammed up in my serter and failed to insert. It turns out the tape got caught and was preventing it from inserting the sensor :(!

They gave me a new practice sensor, and the second time went off without a hitch, so John and I prepared to insert our first *real* sensors. I chose to put mine on my back, still above the belt line but very far from my abdomen. I know it would have been easier to do it where I could easily see what I was doing, but I also know that having something in my stomach for 6 days would drive me crazy.

I picked a spot, inserted my sensor, waited 5 seconds, and removed the serter. Voila! It was in!

Before even removing the needle, I twisted to pull the top of my skirt down a bit so I could see the sensor clearly.. aaaaand in the process, I rip out my infusion set.

& to make things even better?

HUGE BLOODY MESS.
(...ew)

So that was fun - being the person who's bleeding from her butt (the top of my butt....but still) while everyone waits for her to catch up. Awesome.

I took a second to remove the sensor needle and apply the overtape at this point. I also used some Skin Prep around the sensor at that time, as I need it to keep things stuck (showers tend to dislodge infusion sets when I don't use Skin Prep ­čÖü ), and the Medtronic nurse told me that if I used the Skin Prep prior to inserting the sensor, the sensor would get gummed up by the Skin Prep and might not work properly. I had no idea!

She said it's not a problem to use it as long as the Skin Prep (or any other product that makes skin sticker) is applied around the sensor after it's already in the skin. It felt extremely awkward to try to wipe under the sensor-tape with a Skin Prep swab, but despite that it still seemed to work ok.

My nurse brought me a spare infusion set, so I just swapped it out for a new one. My reservoir was still working and thankfully didn't give me any more "no delivery" alarms...

Medtronic sensors need about 5 minutes for the sensor to "wet" after they're inserted into the skin, so I spent that time setting up my new infusion set. After that, It was time to attach the transmitter and tape the whole thing down.

Overall, I guess the whole thing went pretty well. A few relatively minor setbacks (a test sensor that jammed, a yanked-out infusion set...) did occur, but honestly if I'm ever going to have a sensor-insertion-experience that's filled with drama and unexpected events, it's prbably best that it happened at a hospital :P.

I've since inserted one new sensor, which went fairly smoothly. I can't say I'm comfortable with the process yet, but hopefully that part will come with time.

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