11
Aug

Misc thoughts that have been floating around

I've had a few thoughts and things that keep coming back. In no particular order:

  • We moved about a month ago. In the midst of unpacking and tidying, I've had a few lows that have fuelled house-cleaning rampages. These flurries of vacuuming, bleaching, etc are incredibly productive, if not particularly healthy.
  • Hoosband was away camping with friends about 3 weeks ago. I fired up the Minimed Connect and added my mom to the list of people to be alerted by text if I went low, since Hoobs wouldn't have any cell service. Night 2 of this camping trip, I had a bad overnight low and I woke up to my dad offering me a glass of juice. I really, truly thought I was in good shape and had a handle on my overnight blood sugars. Guess it just goes to show that things are never certain when it comes to diabetes. 
  • My mom came grocery shopping with me on my first shopping trip after the move. When I mentioned that I needed dish soap, she pulled me aside and solemnly explained how I should go for the soap with a flip-top instead of a pull-top, as the pull-top bottles tend to get all gummed up with soap. I ended up stifling a laugh as I told her that it is a new house, yes, but this is far from my first time buying dish soap. I know what I'm doing. Sort of.
  • I still haven't finished unpacking my pump supplies. I'll get to it... when the current box of infusion sets runs out.

Diabetes has been taking a backseat to the rest of Life lately. That should really change, soon.

6
Jul

Keeping it together: Wedding Planning Edition

I thought I have been doing quite well.
Sure, I've had a few more lows than usual. Sure, stress can do that. And sure, I keep having to remind myself after treating these lows that maybe it's time to slash away at my basal rates so these lows happen less often, but then I forget right up until the next 2.7 is staring me in the face.
Then this happened,  and I found myself sitting in my office 2 days ago with an empty pump and a 6-day-old infusion set. That may be the norm for some, but I usually try to keep to a 3- or 4-day site rotation, so 6 is a bit much. Limiting sets to 3 or 4 days usually easy for me, since I've never made it past day 4 with any insulin left in my reservoir.
I think at this point it's safe to say that despite my best (okay, my medium-est) efforts, wedding planning has bested me. Diabetes care has fallen by the wayside. I'm still here, still bolusing for food and chowing back on glucose tablets when I'm low, but being proactive about my self-care is taking a backseat to all of the wedding stuff.
So, step 1 has been Recognizing The Need For Change. I guess step 2 is actually doing it.  On that note, I will upload my cgm data to Carelink when I get home tonight. I will. Tonight.
I mean, not right away tonight. We have a meeting with the wedding DJ after work. But after that. Definitely.

18
May

Telling an edited version of the story

I realized something slightly ridiculous today.

 

I told a lie about why I ended up waking up with a high BG this morning. I was out with a group of friends, but the migrane that's been edging in since I first woke up was getting louder and angrier by the minute. I spoke to the hostess to politely excuse myself so I could go home to sit in a very quiet room with the lights dimmed, and this kind, wonderful friend of mine asked what was up.

 

I told her, as well as her parents who had just arrived to the soiree, that I woke up with a high blood sugar and a splitting headache and it's been getting worse all day. I then shrugged. It must have been a kinked pump cannula or something, I explained. That's definitely why I woke up high.

 

It's not, though. I was 4.3 with 1.5 units of insulin on board when I checked before bed. I'd just started a new cgm and was still in the 2-hour warm-up period, so I had no cgm graph to indicate whether I was stable or dropping. I was uncomfortable going to bed at that number with insulin still on board, so I chugged back a juice box before brushing my teeth and going to bed.

 

I was, in case you can't tell where this is going, very mistaken about the effects of my on-board insulin. I woke up at 14 -- by far not the worst blood sugar I've ever seen upon waking up, but still high enough to give me the headachey, fuzzy-mouthed irritability that comes with a few solid hours of high BGs.

 

The part that's truly baffling though, is why did I lie? I'm positive my friend could not give less of a shit about the finer details. Why not just admit that I was scared of going low overnight, so I overreacted? There would be no judgement from this friend; no chastising me for not waiting it out or setting an alarm to check overnight. No finger-wagging or tsk-tsk-tsking at how I jumped the gun and treated a low that hadn't happened yet.

 

I know my actions weren't ideal. I think my reasons (fear of going low) are perfectly reasonable, but still I obviously overtreated. Why did I hide that information? Why treat it like I have something to hide?

2
Jan

<3

For those lows when it feels like laying down is great, and no matter what happens I should lay down and should stay that way:

image

boyfriend aka bringer of juice

I am very lucky to have him.

29
May

Week 1 on the pump

So...whoa. I guess I knew that it wouldn't be easy, but my first week on a pump was exhausting.  Hell, my first *day* on the pump was pretty scary.

I arrived for my pump start at 9am, and the first thing we did was to actually start me on the pump. I was so nervous/excited,  my hands were shaking a little :P. My nurse/CDE, Brenda, told me that for the first few set changes she wanted me to put the set somewhere on my abdomen -- somewhere I could see it, and also not someplace where my insulin absorption would change drastically if I exercised (like it might do in my thigh or butt). I noticed almost immediately after inserting the set that it was uncomfortable, and sure enough, it remained uncomfortable over the 3 days that I wore it (but more on my dislike for absomen sites later).

I got to eat breakfast next. Brenda and the nutrition student who was sitting in on a pump start (for credit hours, I think) left me for a bit while I chowed down, then came back about 20 minutes later to jump right back in to the pump training.

We next went theough "the checklist," which was essentially a (very repetitive) list of training items, most of which were things I already felt comfortable doing. We covered things like giving boluses, setting up carb ratios and insulin sensitivity, adjusting basal rates, etc. As far as using the pump goes I actually felt fairly confident, but I did want to spend more time learning how to make changes to basal rates & how to recognize when I need to make changes.

As we went through all of the training items, I did my 2-hour post-breakfast check (a little high), and my training went until around the 3.5-hour mark. After that they sent me home with instructions to check 2 and 4 hours after meals & twice overnight all week, and with a promise that Brenda would be calling me twice per day to discuss my numbers.

I had 2 bad lows on my first day on the pump; one after lunch and another after dinner.  Both were scary, for me, as they were 2.2 and 2.4 and came with no symptoms.I honestly think that I was just so excited/tired/hungry/stressed that everything was out of whack. I hope that's what it was, since I never get lows like that with no symptoms...

Things started to calm down over the rest of the week, although I spent a lot of the week running a little on the high side. I was up overnight, multiple times, so I spent a lot of my waking hours taking short naps in between eating & doing post-meal checks. Overall,  a pump start is definitely not an experience I'd care to repeat, but having gone through it I can say that I'm happy I put the work into fine-tuning my basal rates and carb ratios.

2 weeks in and I'm still feeling pretty good about being on a pump, so I'd say that's a good sign. There was always a small part of me that worried about the being-attached-to-a-device thing. I wondered whether having a visible sign of my diabetes clipped to my hip would start to weigh down on me and cause last year's burnout and depression to rear their ugly heads. If a pump was truly helping with my diabetes management, I know I could always turn to the wonderful doctors and medical professionals who helped me through it last time around, but quite honestly the while period was horrible and I wouldn't care to repeat it. The actual physical device has only been a minor annoyance when it comes to wearing dresses, but luckily that's it so far!

11
Jan

Hello again, nighttime lows.

My second low of the night - by 2am I had hit 2.5 (45 mg/dl) TWICE. This is a) unusual for me, and b) super crappy.

Naturally,  I dealt with the second low by drinking....this:
image

(that jug of juice was full before I opened it to treat low #2)

Also naturally, a half hour later I am 11.2 (~200 mg/dl) and probably still rising.

I'm just getting over a head cold (which usually pushes me super high), as well as a double bacterial eye infection caused by the spreading of a sinus infection (SO. GROSS.), and am on nasal spray steroids to deal with the sinus stuff (which I would expect to also cause highs?) but, much to my surprise, lows have been kicking my ass lately.  I've reduced my levemir by 20%, and I'm thinking my nighttime dose needs to come down even more. I wish everything could just stay nice & stable... like, once basals and boluses are all figured out, we could have nothing ever change. With all of the extra work that d-folks already do just to stay healthy, is that too much to ask?

K, whine officially over. Time to get back to bed!

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